Raw, Unadulterated Hate Leads to the Deadly D’s

DIVISION. DECEPTION. DENIAL. DISCOURAGEMENT. DESTRUCTION.

In my near-century of life, in this magnificent Republic, I have never witnessed the kind of raw, unadulterated, unfiltered hate that causes our Republic to shake and shiver; the earthquake of this hate will take us down a path of losing our precious Republic and therefore our freedoms. I have witnessed division in every institution that I have served or been a part of: school, church, college, etc.

In all parts of our lives, we encounter differences of opinion; some can be angry discussions, while others can be calm and pure, productive dialogue. After the differences of opinion are aired and ultimately settled as we carry out our government as our founders intended, we may still have divisions, but they are not hateful, self-destroying actions. We go on carrying out government of the wise people who gave us this magnificent Republic, one-of-a-kind government. But the division that exists in our country now is a different species than our founders anticipated as a result of differences of opinion, whether it be political, personal, educational or any part of our life.

The hate for President Trump has no bounds. It has tons of energy and unswerving, unwilling commitment to remove him from office. Traditionally, we elect a president and go on with knowledge that our constitution and founding documents have served us well. Also, with the knowledge that if not satisfied with the government elected, our founders have provided us with an out – elect new people. This process was meant to keep the power in the hands of the people – We The People. But it is obvious that our very Republic stands at the brink of a chasm of hate that has no bottom. This unfiltered hate for Trump and his followers leads to the Deadly D’s. The results are obvious – Division, Deception, Discouragement, Denial and ultimate Destruction of our Republic.

The founders had great discussion over many of these issues in our government. We need to send in the substitutes for the hate mongers. We need to send in people of good will, people of unending love, people with absolute integrity, people who encourage each other and people who build not destroy. The final remedy is to discuss honestly our foundings and our blessings. We need to sprinkle all these discussions with raw unfiltered, unswerving love for our country and each other.

 

 

Keep Christ in Christmas

             Well, of course, Christ is in Christmas. We even spell, speak, advertise, use the word in our greeting, call it a holiday, send Christmas cards, and on and on. It seems like such superfluous conversation. It is the reason for the season, we say. We take Christmas vacations, except in some schools where they want to be politically correct and take winter breaks. We go over the river and through the woods to grandma’s house for Christmas dinner. We have Christmas Eve church services to celebrate the coming of the baby Jesus, our Christ of Christmas.

            We open our gifts according to family tradition. We celebrate the season with a Christmas tree and Christmas decorations. There are Christmas cookies and special Christmas recipes for Christmas candy. There is the much maligned and much loved fruit cake. And occasionally there is a birthday cake for the birthday person—Jesus of Nazareth. It is really a world-wide birthday celebration.

            Yes, it is embedded in everything that we do on December 25 each year. But perhaps that’s the problem. Where is the real meaning? Most of us know the story. We have heard it so many times. We have sung about the baby away in the manger. I’m certain many of us have donned the duds of the various components of the Christmas pageant. We have traversed from afar and carried the gold, incense, and myrrh to the cradle of the baby Jesus. We have seen the star in the East that led the way to the manger. And the herald angels sing in the choirs of the world each Christmas season.

            It is C-H-R-I-S-T-mas. It is the baby Jesus, born of the virgin Mary, we celebrate. Yes, it is the Son of God who came to Bethlehem that night. Would you be willing to be Joseph or Mary and carry out this incredible happening? But it had to be that way for the rest of our Christian heritage to unfold for us. The baby Jesus, the Son of God, had to be born in the way that he was to give us Easter. There had to be the Christ in Christmas who died on the Cross that we might live.

            Christ is in Christmas, no matter what some might want to do to take him out. We must make certain that when they take the manger scene from the city square, or substitute Happy Holidays for Merry Christmas,  change Christmas vacation to winter break, that each one of us who believes keeps Christ in Christmas.  Even when they teach fifth graders new versions of our beautiful Christmas carols to be politically correct and not offend anyone, we must keep Christ in Christmas everywhere we go and in everything that we do.

            I am not going to be tolerant about this issue; it is too important. Christ of Christmas is my guiding star, the star that lights my world. I will not be tolerant about this truth. I will fight to keep Christ in Christmas in every conceivable way that I can to remind us that Christ is the reason for the season. For those who claim otherwise: stop claiming the season.                

            

Memories of a Past Thanksgiving

It’s amazing how easy it is for folks to get into the spirit of a holiday. Those special days are reminders, lest we forget. On Thanksgiving, people gather around a feast-laden table. They hold hands and give thanks for all those present, those who are not at the table, for friends, family, and the food that has been provided. There is reverence, gratitude, joy, and friendship. Conversations are civil and memory rich. “Remember the time that…”

The feast is just part of the day as families and friends gather. A father throws endless high-arching passes to his young  son who deftly grabs the football and throws it back, eagerly awaiting the next pass. Two little pre-teen, compatible cousins shoot hoops or drop by the appetizers to grab bites to fill the voids in growing girls bodies. Or all of the kids invent their own games and laugh and squeal with delight. And there is always the cell phone activity. And there are older cousins who sit and talk, text a lot, and help when called. The television is tuned to the Thanksgiving Day football game, sometimes eagerly watched and other times totally ignored.

The kitchen is the busiest place in the house where it’s all systems go! Beautiful children continue to run in and out and through the house. Grandma and grandpa sit with smiles at the wonder of it all. Moms and Dads are trying to manage the stress of such a big day with so many moving parts. But they all come together and dinner is served. The after-dinner game of hide-and-seek in the house is a game enjoyed by the little and the “big” kids

As we think about our Thanksgiving Day filled with so many positive happenings, so much love, so much fun, and so many pictures for the camera of the soul, we smile and give thanks.

If we were to journal the week following Thanksgiving, we would find the same things happening and more, just not all in one place. Somehow we forget to be grateful for the ordinary things that happen every day. The simple things that we hurry through–the warm shower, a breakfast, the beauty of a morning walk, the children clamoring for our attention as they ready for school, the car and the roads that take us to work or school, our teachers, our colleagues, our friends and neighbors. Learning to be grateful is a task for all moments. So often we don’t say thanks until we regain something we have lost.

On the day after Thanksgiving we have the same choice that we have each day: to be grateful or not. The joy experienced from the gratefulness expressed and felt on Thanksgiving Day is available each day, each hour, each minute. It is a gift that is with us always, but we must choose to be grateful. With gratitude, comes joy.

Recalling My Navy History – Proud to Be a Veteran at 98

 Every one is a veteran of something because you have done it for some time, but being a Veteran because  you have raised your right hand to serve your country, uphold its Constitution, and protect it from enemies from within and without, is quite a different matter. You are allowed to wear that uniform that sets you apart and requires much of you.

        Military service was not on my planned life’s journey itinerary. That is, until a young female naval officer came to talk to the girls in her former high school in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Those girls just happened to be in my physical education and biology classes. These kids were among those I taught in my first teaching job.

        I was a mere 21. She talked of the War, the Navy, the opportunity, but most of all the duty. It was early 1943; Pearl Harbor was still a raw subject. The War in the Pacific was horrific. The War in Europe was difficult. The young naval officer was not a recruiter; she was just a citizen turned patriot. She was going to do whatever she could to help those brave men aboard the ships, the planes, and the landing barges that carried the men to islands in the Pacific that became infamous and those that sometimes weren’t even named on the maps of the world.

        The Navy needed physical education instructors to work with the physical fitness of the WAVES, the women in the Navy, she said. I could do that; I could serve my country. After I enlisted, I was sent to Minneapolis, Minnesota, for my physical. During my interview, the officer suggested that I was too young to be an officer. In my youth, I became enraged and gave a lecture to her on the lack of relationship between age and maturity. She was not pleased, decided to rid herself of the upstart, and sent me to take the physical. Having been blessed with good health coupled with my attention to my fitness, the physical was a breeze.

I raised my right hand, repeated the words of the oath, and I was in the Navy. I thought that I would be able to finish out the school year, but that was not to be. I was called to my first duty base in May, 1943.

        Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, was like a foreign country to this small town girl from Iowa and the pheasant filled prairies of South Dakota. It is a beautiful and elite women’s college. The town was definitely a cultural adventure for me. We ate at the famous Inn in the city. I came to understand that the food was extraordinary. But then I only knew lobsters existed because I studied Biology in college. I came to relish the new things to explore. It did not take long to appreciate the fine cuisine at the Inn.

        I came also to understand the uniqueness of the women with whom I served. I was one of very few with just a bachelors degree; most had masters and doctorates. It was amazing to learn what people had left to raise their right hand. So many left very prestigious positions. It truly was an interesting, diverse mix of women who had accomplished much in their civilian lives; I did not truly understand how much until after the War when I came to understand fully the glass ceiling.

        As the training came to a close, we all eagerly awaited our “orders.” Mine took me to the Naval Air Technical Training Center at Millington, Tennessee, not far from Memphis. It was a huge base with a Naval Air Station across the street and a Naval Hospital just down the street. The military during the War was a great melting pot and equalizer. The uniform of the United States Navy or Marine Corps was the same for celebrity, teacher, farmer, business executive, movie star, football coaches and football stars, famous chefs and photographers, holders of gold medals, the college grad, or the kid who dropped out of school. Insignia told you what they were doing, but most certainly not where they were from. But we all took the same oath.

Yes, I am proud to be a veteran. I have been able to speak of my pride when folks express surprise that I was in the Navy. Some seem to think that women in the armed services were quite different from those that I knew. My children know that I am proud; I know they are, too. My grandchildren know that I am proud; I know they are, too. My friends know, my colleagues know, and any shipmates I meet certainly know. The sports guy who wants to stop playing the national anthem at sports events will never know or understand my pride. Too bad. His loss.

       America, feel my pride.   I am just one among so many. But I am ONE. As long as I have voice and pen, I will tell you about my  pride.  Do not ignore those who would silence the pride of those who know it. And above all, preserve the voice of those who served and paid the price of the silent voice. They rest with pride; we must be their voice, too.

Danger for Our Children – The Monopoly of Public Education

For almost a century I have been a rider on the merry-go-round called education. Experts with many ideas have jumped off and on. The dashing horses have been painted new colors and given new names. Sometimes the horses were replaced with elegant carriages. But the music didn’t change much; the same melodic sounds remind you that it is still a merry-go-round. People come and ride because it is nostalgic. Workers come and go and try to change the music, but powerful groups like the music as it is.

The monopoly continues. Before compulsory education, literacy rates were higher than before this compulsory monopoly was created. Millions of Americans over the age of sixteen can’t read or fill in simple applications with personal data. Many can’t write simple letters or messages or do simple arithmetic problems. This monopoly has created a system of protections for unfit, unwilling, and non-productive personnel; unions not only protect these people, but they make it difficult for the great committed people to do their jobs. Student learning suffers. It is a puzzle, but the puzzle doesn’t have many pieces.

There is a local union supported by a state union supported by a national union supported by union philosophy in general. There are members in all these unions, many who would not belong to unions if they had choice. I know that many union members would not want their dues to be spent on political campaigns. These are the wonderful professionals who are committed and passionate about their work. Think of the money that will be spent on unions this year for pure political reasons. Most of the reasons will be related to power; few will be relative to teaching and learning. Much of the commentary will be about teaching and learning, but the bottom line in action is power.

The committed educators spend their time and energy helping young people accomplish their dreams. But their environment is clouded by the demands of the negotiations, the multi-level government requirements, and the malaise of many who are forced into this monopolistic monolith, public education.

In addition, the more that we try to be all things to all people, the less we are to anyone. State directed curriculum and state and national testing have added great burdens for our teachers and students. Legislation is passed because of pressure from one group or another. Trying to meet the various directives buries educators under mountains of paperwork that take valuable time from teaching and learning activities.

One might ask how this entity stays in business, why parents don’t make other choices. Public schools are protected with government compulsion. Children are forced to attend; parents are forced to pay school taxes, school boards must negotiate with the unions, and unions oppose any school choice options that appear. In addition, private schools are out of the reach financially of most families. Charter schools particularly are opposed by the unions, and therefore, by many teachers who enlist the aid of their students’ parents to also oppose them.

Until this monopoly is broken, or by some magic, choice becomes a viable option for all, our merry-go-round will only see surface changes, new paint, a new melody here and there. The price for our young learners may become more critical. We now must add the fact that we have a carrousel not suited to many riders of the last century, but one now playing music that is not even recognized by the natives of the digital learners of the 21st century.

American Dream or American Nightmare

The loss of our American Dream means the loss of our precious freedoms

What shocking news!!! News Flash!!!

There is an overwhelming number of college graduates and young people who don’t believe in the American Dream.

I am stunned. The questions then become: What do they believe the American Dream was/is? Do they have no great dreams or visions? What do they see as their future and the future for generations to come? Have they lost the ability?

My American Dream is as alive today as it was when I graduated from college in 1942. It’s as alive as it was when I was a little girl hoeing in my potato field in the Iowa sun when I was in high school; my grandfather never gave me money but always the opportunity to earn a little money. It’s as alive as when I joined the U.S. Navy in 1943. And so it was when I got my first, second, third and every teaching job. Certainly it was alive when I got married and most of all when my children were born. And it was renewed greatly when my grandchildren were born. It was alive when I had the privilege of getting my doctorate. It is as alive today as it was when I took my walk to my first little white country school. It was alive in the faces of those I have taught. It was more alive when I came home from every foreign country I have had the privilege to visit.

It’s alive when I take my gratitude walk and give thanks for all my blessings. But it isn’t just the beauty of the place where I have had the good fortune of living for so many years or the long and wonderful life I have been given. My American Dream isn’t the home, the car, the college education, the incredible Thanksgiving feast we will enjoy, or the thought of the coming Christmas tree and all the presents.

It is simply my FREEDOMS, those great freedoms that are my birthright and the birthright of every person born in this country and those who choose to make it their land. It is the freedom given to me at my creation to become all that I was created to be. It is the freedom guaranteed me under the Constitution and the Bill of Rights that allows me the liberty to have, and do and be all that I choose. It is those freedoms that I work to preserve for my children and grandchildren. If we do not have freedom, we cannot help others to achieve freedom.

To lose that American Dream, the dream our founders secured for us in our history, can only happen if we forget who we are. We can only lose the American Dream of freedom if we lose sight of what secures this liberty for ourselves and those who follow.

If the majority of college graduates and young people don’t know what the American Dream is or have lost it, we have a big problem to solve. If colleges and total educational system are teaching our young a distorted view of our history, a view of our Republic as a place of greed or a country devoid of “social justice,” or when they applaud and teach forms of government that have clearly failed, maybe those colleges and schools are not worthy of our young. When our educational system has forgotten the founding principles that have made them great, perhaps they don’t deserve our bright young people.

When our highly respected places of learning turn our young into voices who believe the American Dream no longer exists or is dead, it means to me that they have succeeded in brainwashing them into believing that independence, self-reliance, government only by the consent of the governed, guarantees of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are all fictions of an older generation’s imagination. It’s time, they must be teaching, for a new set of rules that matches the needs of the time.

I’m always learning, and I am forever learning that liberty doesn’t need a new set of rules or regulations that match “the changing times.” Liberty is timeless. It is about the freedoms guaranteed in our founding documents and by our Creator. It is about the spirit born in each one of us. It is about independence and self-worth that allow us to be all that we can be. Only then can we preserve the liberty for others.

I think of all the young men and women who join the service to earn the right to go to college. They are fighting and dying to preserve the American Dream. Will they be humiliated and met with derision for their commitment? Will they be made to feel stupid for believing in the things they fought for and many died for?

It’s not only college tuition that is expensive. Much more expensive is what’s being taught there that can turn many of its graduates into believers that the American Dream is dead. These young graduates are many of our future leaders who will not even understand that they are continuing to turn out the lights on “the shining city on the hill.”

It was the dream of religious freedom that founded us, and it is the continuing dream of freedom that will preserve us.  We must not lose it or not understand what it is. The alternative to a beautiful dream is an unwanted nightmare.

Patriotism and Freedom or Transformation to Slavery

Almost daily there is a story, an anecdote, or a report about a school in America where students who are wearing patriotic shirts or symbols are being sent home, asked to turn their shirts inside out, or given another shirt to wear. The reason usually given is that the attire creates an uncomfortable situation for other students, or could cause trouble or a conflict situation. These are American schools. Are we not teaching our young to honor the nation in which they were born or have chosen to call their own? When students who honor their country and their heritage by  the wearing of attire, the stars and stripes of our nation, are harassed and sent home on Cinco de Mayo Day, or any other day, it is time for citizens to go to war, a war that restores education in America to its founder’s dreams.

One needs only to look at Washington’s address to his army in camp on Long Island:

 “The time is now near at hand, which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves, whether their homes and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed and themselves to be consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human effort will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and the conduct of this army. Our Cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us only the choice of a brave resistance or the most abject submission. We have, therefore, to resolve to conquer or to die.”

Yes, the time is now at hand to determine whether our schools will be instruments for freedom or for the transformation of our country to slavery. Will our schools promote the cause of transformation or the cause of freedom?

Washington continued: 

“Our own, our country’s honor, calls upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion. If we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. The eyes of all our countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings and praises if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the tyranny meditated against them. Let us, therefore, animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a freeman contending for liberty on his own ground is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.”

We have had the eyes of the world upon us from the inception of our country. There were more abroad, I believe, who understood the special nature of our great land than perhaps there were among us who grew up with liberty and assumed that it could always be with us. I am keenly aware that my liberty as I’ve been privileged to live it for the 98 years I have been given, is very much in jeopardy.

It is the eye that I have upon myself that compels me to write this document. I have given my life to serving in a profession for which I still have great passion. But I wonder what I could have done earlier, what I could have contributed to the minds of our new generations to preserve the tenets of our founders. All know that to transform a country you must control the minds of the young. You must erode the values that stand in the way of the transformation. You must guide students’ thinking away from the founding principles of our nation.

Those of us who refuse to allow the transformers to have their way know too, that we have allowed others to re-write our history books. We have allowed multicultural ideas and activities to become the god of plurality and diversity. No people could possibly be more diverse than the multitudes from around the world that came to our shores. But they did not carry the flags of their nation on our holidays; they proudly carried the American flag and sang our national songs. Yes, they added the richness of their culture to blend into the culture of this new, great land. From their easel of experiences and varied backgrounds, they painted the great portrait that became America.

We have become afraid to be proud of our country, the country that millions have sought to call their own. We have taught our young to apologize for being American rather than teaching them to demonstrate their love, respect, pride, and gratitude for being a fortunate inhabitant of the “Shining City on the Hill.”

America First – Status of Our Ship of State

 America First  was published in 1916 by the American Book Company. It was written by Jasper L. McBrien, who at the time of the writing was School Extension Specialist for the United States Bureau of Education, and a former Superintendent of Public Instruction of Nebraska.

McBrien writes in the Foreward:

The rising generation, both native-born and foreign, to get the full meaning of this slogan (America First) in its far-reaching significance, must have time for study and reflection along patriotic lines. There must be the right material on which the American youth may settle their thoughts for a definite end in patriotism if our country is to have a new birth of freedom and if ‘this government of the people, by the people, and for the people is not to perish from the earth.’ The prime and vital service of amalgamating into one homogenous body the children alike of those who are born here and of those who come here from so many different lands must be rendered this Republic by the school teachers of America.  

Brien continues: The purpose of this book is to furnish the teachers and pupils of our country, material with which the idea of true Americanism may be developed until ‘America First’ shall become the slogan of every man, woman, and child in the United States.

 I cannot say it better.

I have lived most of the years since this book was published. I have lived the changes. I believe that we need a large dose of patriotism and an understanding of our history now more than ever before. In my 98 years, I have seen our ship of state on so many different courses. But, I’ve never seen the culture in such turmoil and division as exists now. Nor have I seen such effort to render us rudderless. This always seems so tragic when we have been given by our Founders the greatest set of maps, our founding documents, ever devised for any people with which to keep a ship of state on course. They were carefully designed to make certain that the government was of the people, by the people, and for the people.

I fear the shoals, the rocks, the reefs, and horrific storms ahead. With the dialogue of pending impeachment, the hate expressed by the media and various factions, the general tenor of discontent in our country are all signs of trouble in our Republic. The constant battle of the “transfomers” to change our country to something far from its founding is very dangerous to that very founding. The desire to change fundamental principles and documents in our nation is a sign that the battle is real and intense. These people who hate the Captain of our ship so intensely that they are willing to sell their souls to insist on a new Captain. We are in dangerous waters; we need to pay close attention to what these entrenched change-agents are doing to our Republic. They want to turn our founding documents and founding principles to the opposite extremes. Socialism, as they profess it, makes extinct our remarkable constitution and founding documents that keep us governmentally a republic. That is our heritage, that is our uniqueness and that better be our future.

 

Religious Freedom and Our Schools

One of the more amazing things that I have come to examine more and more is how cleverly the transformers have used “religious freedom,” one of the great tenets on which our Founders based everything. Diabolically, they have taken this great foundation of tolerance for all religions and turned it on its back. They used our deep desire for tolerance of religion to preach to us about tolerance in all areas. While they are extracting tolerance from us, they are free to practice intolerance. If we show the least bit of resistance, they know how to make most of us feel guilty. They have most certainly used all areas of our society when and how ever they could.

They have flooded our schools with multiculturalism. They have used our national instincts for tolerance to promote their agenda. While they have been removing more and more Christian ideas and ideals from our books, they have been putting more and more about other religions in our school books. While they are teaching our kids more and more about tolerating other religion, they have been distorting the historical facts about the religious content of our beginnings.

Universities, where I have spent much of my career, are the worst offenders. To find a conservative professor is quite a task. I have taught my classes during student strikes; I was told by my peers that I must not do that. Opposing the strike was not a good political move. I insisted that I was only conforming with what they were striking for—freedom of speech and assembly. If the students who were striking had the right to not attend class, then the students who wanted to attend class must have the same right. Oddly, no one seemed to be able to dispute that logic.

Universities are populated with boatloads of Marxists. Many don’t outwardly admit to the name, but they teach and indoctrinate their students with those ideals. Most young people who attend the liberal colleges, most are, come home after a short time to discuss with their parents if conservative, how wrong they are. “You don’t understand. Your way of thinking is old fashioned. There are more modern ways of thinking about our political system and our economy.”

The change in many, including my own, occurs when they get their first pay check and discover how little “they have left” after all the deductions are made. “Mom, this is not fair.” It’s a natural place to take them back to what you taught them in the first place. They find an eternal truth. Old doesn’t mean bad or outdated. So it is with our Founding Documents, our founding ideals, and our God given rights. They are no more out of style than the Bible is for a Christian. .

Churches have been used extensively to fight the battles of the transformers. The strange part of this is that one would expect most religions to want to keep Christ in Christmas, would want to keep our Christian beginnings in the textbooks and in our teaching, and our God given rights ever before our student’s eyes as God given rather than government given. I suspect that sometimes our church people are the most vulnerable to the tolerance pleas and the subsequent guilt that follows if they don’t succumb.

Our School Boards that succumb to the distortion of the holidays, who don’t follow what’s in their textbooks or what is being taught in their classrooms, are also at fault. It is difficult at the school board level to know. Often you are “protected” from knowing for the fear of “micromanagement.” Our young people are in school many hours a day during their formative years. The inclusions and exclusions in our textbooks are critical to our future. As McBrien said in America First many years ago, “There must be the right material on which the American youth may settle their thoughts for a definite end in patriotism if our country is to have a new birth of freedom and if “this government of the people, by the people, and for the people is not to perish from the earth.”  This is so true for this day.

 

 

 

Political Correctness and Tolerance

One of the great cornerstones of our republic is tolerance. Our Founders came from  various countries where religious freedom was not present, and other freedoms were restricted. Property was in the hands of a few. Government rule was in the hands of a king or monarch of some sort. Freedom to speak and to assemble were restricted if present at all. Justice systems were autocratic and often trials did not exist; one person could be judge and jury. Our Founders were seekers of freedom.

They were often dissidents seeking religious freedom as the basis for other freedoms. Because they wanted to be free to practice their religious choice, they sought this for all people. For this to become reality in their new home, they demanded freedom to practice their own beliefs and the freedom for others to practice their beliefs. Thus this great principle of tolerance was basic. Tolerance was a necessity. This tolerance was embedded in their personal lives and guaranteed in their governing documents.

We became a super-tolerant nation. We welcomed others. Our Statue of Liberty became the symbol for the masses seeking freedom. Ellis Island became the beginning of that road  for the many seeking freedom they longed for.

Unfortunately, that very tolerance and acceptance of other peoples, views and other religions have been used to transform, to undermine, to try to destroy our founding principles and even our founding documents. That very tolerance for all religions has been used to diminish our Christian heritage. That tolerance has been used to distort the values and principles of our republic.

Our history books have watered down our founding; they have heralded other cultures and religions while omitting our Christian founding. We have become afraid to acknowledge our exceptionality and instead apologize  for our freedoms and successes. Our tolerance has been transformed into political correctness.

We need to stand tall; we need to appreciate what our exceptionality has allowed us to do and be. We need to be proud of the values and principles embodied in our founding documents. We have not kept the light from the “shining city on the hill”  focused on us only. We have sent the beams of freedom’s light all around the world. We have given of ourselves and our plenty. We have fought and died for the freedoms born of the tolerance we inherited.

Now we must become intolerant of those who would use our tolerance against us. We must not feel guilty of our heritage. We must not fear to be exceptional. We must again proclaim with verve and gusto the founding principles of this great republic. We must, because the alternative is unthinkable.